Tag Archives: toned canvas

Sunflowers in blue bowl

Sunflowers in blue bowl, 16 x 20, oil on canvas, Kit Miracle

Sunflowers in blue bowl, 16 x 20, oil on canvas, Kit Miracle

This is another example of a slow painting.  If you’ve followed my blog, you know that I like to paint en plein air.  The challenge of turning out a speedy painting in a couple of hours is fun.  However, some of my best work is when I create a studio painting which may take weeks or more.

This blue bowl of sunflower and zinnias presented its own challenges.  If you’ve ever painted live sunflowers, then you know that they keep up their rhythm of turning towards the sun.  This means every time you return to the studio, the darn flowers have rearranged themselves!

This is an oil on a toned canvas.  I spent about a week and a half on this painting.  I don’t know if the painting is actually done but I’m finished working on it.  The flowers were in pretty sad shape by the time I finished. I like the careful attention to detail but it is a real trick to not overwork a painting.  It should look effortless for best effect.  In my opinion.

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Painting Nova Scotia

Cabot Trail, most iconic of drives.

Cabot Trail, most iconic of drives.

My husband and I made a trip to Nova Scotia last month.  Neither of us had been up that way.  It was so beautiful!  I took my painting materials but came home with enough subject matter to last for a long time.  We spent a week on Nova Scotia south shore, then toured the Cabot Trail in Cape Breton and finally ended on Prince Edward Island.  The weather was lovely with temps in the low seventies, dipping to the fifties and even forties at night.  Perfect for August, I think.

Nova Scotia Beach, Storm  Coming

Nova Scotia Beach, Storm Coming

Here are the first few paintings, some painted on location, some back here at home.  Rugged shores, pines, ocean, beautiful sunsets and sunrises, quaint towns and fishing villages…what more could an artist want?  As always, I appreciate any feedback.

Painting at Sand Hills Beach, Nova Scotia, Kit Miracle

Painting at Sand Hills Beach, Nova Scotia, Kit Miracle

Sunrise, Nova Scotia, oil on canvas, 12x16, Kit Miracle

Sunrise, Nova Scotia, oil on canvas, 12×16, Kit Miracle

French Lily, oil on canvas, 12x16, Kit Miracle

French Lily, oil on canvas, 12×16, Kit Miracle

Cape Breton, Cabot Trail, 12x16, oil on canvas board, Kit Miracle

Cape Breton, Cabot Trail, 12×16, oil on canvas board, Kit Miracle

Ritter Creek, Painting A Complex Subject

Ritter Creek, Final, 24 x 30, oil on canvas, Kit Miracle

Ritter Creek, Final, 24 x 30, oil on canvas, Kit Miracle

Ritter Creek is just down the road from me.  Like my last posting of French Lick Creek, this was also painted on a toned canvas.  However, this was a very complex subject, lowland creek bottom with many trees.  Check out my step-by-step demonstration for further information.  Sometimes as the artist, you must take things out to make a better composition.  Ritter Creek, Demonstration

Making friends with green

French Lick Creek, final, oil on canvas, 24x30, Kit Miracle

French Lick Creek, final, oil on canvas, 24×30, Kit Miracle

Green is one of the most difficult colors for most artists to handle.  However, if you’re going to paint landscapes, you’d better make friends with green.  I think the biggest mistake inexperienced artists make is not really looking at the color.  Green comes in many varieties – yellowish, orangey, silver, blue, purple.  Even just looking closely and slightly emphasizing what you see will help you immensely.  To learn more about the painting above and to see a demo, check out the page French Lick Creek, making friends with green, demonstration.

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Junipers at Grand Canyon – Demonstration

Junipers at Grand Canyon, final, oil on canvas, 24 x 30

Junipers at Grand Canyon, final, oil on canvas, 24 x 30

I just completed this 24 x 30 oil painting of Junipers at the Grand Canyon.  I love their gnarly trunks and timeless quality.  Check out my demonstration at https://my90acres.com/artwork/junipers-at-grand-canyon-demonstration/

 

How to tone a canvas

TonedcanvasIn an earlier how-to post, I told you about the why of using a toned canvas but I thought I’d review that again.

Using a toned canvas takes away the fear and indecision of painting for many artists. You already HAVE something on the canvas. Mostly when you’re painting, you’re using push-pull. That is, pushing the background into the back, and pulling the foreground up front. You see this more often with artists drawing on toned paper, such as, pastel artists. This is a very old technique, maybe centuries old.

I like it because it seems as if the tone color (whatever I may have chosen) fills in the broken spaces of my paintings. A search on the internet will turn up quite a few artists who use this technique.

Most of the time, I will take leftover paint at the end of a session and tone a bunch of canvases just to have them on hand. Although I do not use this technique all the time, it’s great to be able to grab a few canvases as I’m heading out for some plein air painting. I just seem to be able to get a head start on getting the basics down. However, you can do this on location with just rubbing in some local colors with a rag. It’s entirely up to you.

My preference is for warm colors or even some very dark colors but I have used many – burnt sienna, dark brown/grey, blues, greens and even purples (yuck). One artist I know, Caroline Jasper, uses red for her canvases which adds an element of sparkle, and Wyatt LeGrand uses some very dark tones which also works well for him.

If you haven’t tried this technique, just try it for a few times to see how you like it.

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Tonedcanvas2

Blue-rimmed bowl, still life

Blue-rimmed bowl, still life after Cezanne - final, 18x24, oil on canvas

Blue-rimmed bowl, still life after Cezanne – final, 18×24, oil on canvas

I just completed this painting which is my interpretation of a still life in the style of Cezanne.  Although it is not a copy of any of his paintings, I wanted to challenge myself to interpret his style and used several of the objects that he used in his still lifes.  For a step-by-step view, check it out on my Artwork pages.https://my90acres.com/artwork/blue-rimmed-bowl-still-life-step-by-step/

Chalk Horse, a study in complementary colors

Chalk Horse, final, oil on canvas, 16x20

Chalk Horse, final, oil on canvas, 16×20

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This painting was a study in complementary colors.  Check out the step-by-step on the pages.  https://my90acres.com/artwork/chalk-horse-step-by-step/

The Green Bowl Part 1

Last Sunday, my friend Laura Pommier and I spent the afternoon painting a still life in my studio.  It’s very interesting how two people can look at the same things and come up with entirely different paintings.  Well, a little wine, some snacks and lots of good talk.  It was an afternoon well spent.  Then yesterday I worked on the painting some more, adding the final details.

This is painted on a panel, 12×24 and was toned a pinky-peach color.  Notice in the detail images how I allowed that to shine through for an added glow.

The Green Bowl, 12x24, oil on panel

The Green Bowl, 12×24, oil on panel

The Green Bowl detail 1

The Green Bowl detail 2

The Green Bowl detail 3

The Green Bowl detail 3

What artists do with too much time on their hands

OK, I had six days off for the holidays and spent quite a bit out in my studio.  Escape from…or escape to….I won’t even go there.  Anyway, some time spent nurturing my creative self.  A little tea, a lot of lively music.  (NO Christmas carols!)

I’ve had this little pumpkin hanging around since before Halloween.  I just love the stem of it.  This is an 11×14, oil on canvas.  Painted in about three hours.

Pumpkin, 11x14 oil on canvas

Pumpkin, 11×14 oil on canvas

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I was also able to spend a few days creating this blue and yellow still life.  Check out my Art pages for a complete step-by-step or click on the link below the painting.

Still life, blue bottles and lemons, final.  18x24 oil on canvas

Still life, blue bottles and lemons, final. 18×24 oil on canvas

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

https://my90acres.com/artwork/still-life-with-blue-bottles-and-lemons-step-by-step/