Tag Archives: Arizona

When is a painting finished?

Grand Canyon from the South Rim. Cloud shadows on the rocks. Painted in impressionistic style in acrylic, 20 x 20. Kit Miracle

Sometimes when I’m working on a painting, it just seems to paint itself.  I have a clear vision of what I want and it all comes together.

Other times, not.  I may think I’m finished, then when I go back into the studio, I see a glaring mistake.  Or something I was attempting didn’t quite turn out the way I wanted.

This is a painting of the Grand Canyon from the South Rim.  I was particularly attracted to the play of the cloud shadows across the scene.  The Canyon has such beautiful colors which change constantly throughout the day and the seasons, that it’s difficult to catch just the right time and color.  Sometimes I get some part of the painting which becomes “too precious”, meaning that I like it and tend to paint around it, but it throws off the rest of the composition.

This particular painting was created with the limited palette that I mentioned in my last post but took me far longer than some of my other recent paintings.  In fact, I painted some other paintings and then came back to this one.  Still not sure it’s finished.  What are your thoughts?

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Magic Rocks, Painting the Vortexes of Arizona

Cathedral Rock, original painting, 12 x 16, impasto, Kit Miracle

Whether or not you believe in the magic energy of vortexes, any visitor to Sedona, Arizona will immediately be struck with just how beautiful the area is.  The red rocks with the green juniper trees set against the azure blue skies are just breathtaking.

A few years ago I spent time in Sedona doing some plein air painting.  I got up early in the morning or went out again in the late afternoon to catch the light I love so much.

Bell Rock at Sunset, original painting, 12 x 16, impasto, Kit Miracle

This past week, I revisited my photos and sketches from the trip and decided to paint some of my favorite areas again.  This time, the paintings are a little larger and have some heavy impasto paint to add texture.  I just had so much fun recalling the trip and the time and places while I was working.

Cathedral Rock, back. Original painting, acrylic on canvas board, impasto, 12 x 16, Kit Miracle

Check out these paintings of two of the four vortex rock paintings.  Click on the paintings to see closer views which show the texture of the paint.  Of course, they’ll be for sale on my Etsy shop soon.  I still need to paint the last two sites in the series, Airport Rock and Boynton.

Real or illusion?

Many years ago I read that when Andrew Wyeth was complimented on the realism of his paintings that he responded, “All realistic art is an optical illusion.  You’re taking paint, applying it to a two-dimensional surface and tricking the eye into believing that they’re seeing a real object.” Although this didn’t quite sink in at the time, over the years I’ve come to understand what he was saying.

When I paint a subject in a realistic manner, I am literally fooling the eye.  My son was looking at the painting, Lucky Red, and went up close to examine it.  After a while, he commented that there really wasn’t much there.  I just laughed.  “You’re right,” I said.  “It’s all an optical illusion.”

While I admire artists who have the tenacity to paint every little hair on a rabbit, I really wonder why they are doing that.  Isn’t the entire object of the painting to convey the mood and feeling of the artist?  Personally I believe in letting the viewer become part of the painting by bringing their own knowledge and imagination to the work.  The hard edges certainly define some critical points, but soft edges let one area slide into another, creating a cohesiveness that cannot be obtained photo realism.  My personal opinion, anyway.

Go back and look at some of the original paintings that I’ve posted on here – Lucky Red, Grand Canyon at Moran Point, and Blue Bottles with Lemons.  Then look at these close-up.

Detail - Lucky Red.  Notice how abstractly the fish and seaweed are painted in this glass paperweight.

Detail – Lucky Red. Notice how abstractly the fish and seaweed are painted in this glass paperweight.

The golden Buddha is also painted very loosely.  Notice the sparkles of the ribbon, too.

The golden Buddha is also painted very loosely. Notice the sparkles of the ribbon, too.

This Mediterranean glass paperweight is a mash of swirling colors.  Again, the sparkles on the blue ribbon.

This Mediterranean glass paperweight is a mash of swirling colors. Again, the sparkles on the blue ribbon.

Notice the lost edges of this paperweight blending into the folds of the cloth.

Notice the lost edges of this paperweight blending into the folds of the cloth.

This tree in Grand Canyon at Moran Point is very loosely painted when viewed in detail.

This tree in Grand Canyon at Moran Point is very loosely painted when viewed in detail.

Again, the viewer's eye is blending the colors in this yellow lemon.

Again, the viewer’s eye is blending the colors in this yellow lemon.

Sedona Hills at Sunset

Sedona, final, oil on canvas, 15 x 27, Kit Miracle

Sedona, final, oil on canvas, 15 x 27, Kit Miracle

I fell in love with the red hills in Sedona, Arizona on my recent visit there.  This is a long painting, 15 x 27, which represents the landscape at sunset.  Just north of Bell Rock at sunset.  Check out the link for a step-by-step. https://my90acres.com/artwork/sedona-hills-at-sunset-step-by-step/