Spring has finally arrived

I haven’t always had luck with tulips. They’re like candy to the deer. I planted these last fall right next to my studio. Mikey the dog will keep the critters at bay.

Spring has finally arrived in this part of Southern Indiana.  It’s so beautiful that it takes my breath away.  Remember that crayon you used to have in your box called Spring Green?  Well, it’s all over the place now. At this old homestead (over 130 years), there are many established flowers and trees.  Plus we’ve added many more in the three decades that we’ve lived here.

So I thought you’d just enjoy a walk in the country.  Some of these flowers and trees are already on the wain while others have yet to bloom, the redbuds and dogwoods are just coming out now.  Maybe another post about them later.

An in and out day with the scudding clouds chasing the sunshine. I love the spring greens.

Little pansies are so cheerful. These came from an early foray to the local garden center about a week ago. I couldn’t help myself.

A cheerful crab apple next to the garden. This is a start from the original which was a Mother’s Day present to me many years ago.

More tulips basking in the sunshine.

A friendly little toady emerging from the leftover leaves. He looks a little ragged. I expect he’d like a nice breakfast of some juicy bugs.

The east fields, still soggy from the night’s rain. More clouds and sun shadows.

Bluebells and narcissus. These have become naturalized in several spots of the yard and I have more plans to move some starts elsewhere this spring.

I love violets. They come in so many variations but these deep purple ones seem to be dominant.

The importance of preliminary work

Green and Yellow, 20 x 20, acrylic, Kit Miracle. Intimate Spaces series

I recently posted a step-by-step outline of my painting A Day at the Beach (4-10-2019). A critical part of creating a significant panting is the preliminary work. I sincerely believe that the more thought I put into the piece at the beginning, the more I can work out the problems ahead of time, and the better the final result will be.  Well, that’s my theory anyway.

Green and Yellow, detail.

This is another painting in my series Intimate Spaces, all about the territory that people carve out when they visit the beach.  In this painting, I was sitting behind a couple who staked out their space early in the day with two chairs and an umbrella.  They didn’t show up until mid-afternoon.

NOTAN sketches for Green and Yellow. This is where I work out basic shapes and composition. As you can see, initially I intended this to be a rectangle shape but then changed it to a square shape.

I liked the near silhouette of the couple with the contrast of the kids playing in the surf in front of them. Maybe they were grandma and grandpa.  I don’t know and never did figure it out.

Large graphite sketch of the main characters for Green and Yellow.

As with most of my paintings, I begin with a NOTAN sketch, just hard contrast of black and white to get a feel for the composition.  Then I did a large graphite sketch of the couple.  I didn’t feel a need to sketch the kids as they’re just notes really.  They were painted directly.

NOTAN sketches of past couple of paintings. Working in black and white allows me to focus on the shapes and composition.

Here are a few more examples of NOTAN sketches.  You’ll notice the one from my last post of A Day at the Beach and how I was focusing on the interlocking umbrella shapes.

More NOTAN sketches from Jump.

And the two pages of NOTAN of Jump which I created in February.  With some of the bigger pieces, I’ll also do a color sketch but not always.

The final conclusion is that no matter what style of art you create, you will often have better results if you put in more thought and work into the beginning of your work than having to correct problems later.  Indeed, sometimes you may discover that the scene or piece doesn’t merit following through.  Or you may decide to attack it from a different direction.

A Day at the Beach – Painting a Series

A Day at the Beach, final. 24 x 36, acrylic on canvas, Kit Miracle

As a working artist for over three decades, I find keeping interested in painting involves challenging myself. Sometimes this means new subject matter or new materials. Even a new location helps.  The challenges keep me inspired and allow the mental juices to flow.

My latest challenge is painting a series of paintings revolving around a day at the beach.  I love slice of life subjects, catching people going about their lives without thought of an audience. One thing I’ve noticed is that when people are at the beach, they stake out their territories, bringing the chairs and the umbrellas, the coolers and the toys.  Beach goers seem to operate under the illusion that no one can see them in their little sand kingdoms.

But the artist’s eye can.

The planned series includes vignettes of life at the beach.  Families, couples, kids playing, people just enjoying the sunshine…or totally ignoring their surroundings with their noses in books or napping.  My inspiration for these seaside paintings are John Singer Sargent, Joaquin Sorolla, and Burt Silverman.  It took a lot of effort to make their seaside paintings seem so, well, effortless.  Unstaged even though they often were. And that is the aim of this current series that I’m working on.

The painting above depicts the settling in and establishing of territory by a family.  Mom gets the lounge chairs ready while son is waiting patiently for her attention.  The composition with overlapping umbrellas and tents is like a little city, each with its own slice of life.

The beach walkers and people playing in the surf add distance and perspective to the scene.  I also chose to flatten the color of the sky (no clouds) and the foreground.  This allows the emphasis to be placed on the middle plane where all the action is.

A Day at the Beach is number six in the series.  I have sixteen planned but we’ll see.  A series is an exploration of an idea and I’ll keep at it until I don’t have anything else to say about the subject.

If you’d like to see how this painting was created, click on this link or go under the tab Artworks and click on A Day at the Beach for step-by-step photos.

Thanks for stopping by.

A little inspiration for artists

OK, I will admit it.  I’ve been goofing off this week.  Well, not really but kind of.  The weather has finally turned gorgeous.  Spring is here in force.  Flowers popping out all over.  Just checked the fruit trees and they’re ready to put on a show real soon.

I cruised Home Depot this week as I had some time between meetings in town.  Of course, the garden center attracted me like a magnet.  Which meant that I spent some time this morning planting pansies.  They’re always so cheerful.

What I’m trying to say is that I really don’t have a real post for you today.  Yes, I’m working on a big project in the studio but am not ready to reveal it yet.

What I am going to share are a few of my favorite quotes, all about art.  Be forewarned; I love quotes and have collected hundreds over the years.  They often provide me inspiration or at the very least, food for thought.  I hope they’ll inspire you, too.

More than anything, plein air is an event. It’s an event where a sporting mind can sort things out–free of town-clutter and obligation, where judgment can take as long as it takes–look three times, think twice, paint once. Leave your strokes alone. Fix that colour. Level that horizon. Stop now, stupid, she’s on the hook, pull ‘er in, put ‘er in the creel. You will live to cast again.

Robert Genn

Once you fly, you will walk with your eyes skyward. For there you have been and there you will go again.

Leonardo da Vinci

Be careful that you do not write or paint anything that is not your own, that you don’t know in your own soul.

Emily Carr

A good painting to me has always been like a friend. It keeps me company, comforts and inspires.
Hedy Lamarr

A man paints with his brains and not with his hands.
Michelangelo

All art is autobiographical. The pearl is the oyster’s autobiography.

Federico Fellini

Art enables us to find ourselves and lose ourselves at the same time.
Thomas Merton

Art is the only way to run away without leaving home.
Twyla Tharp

Creativity is allowing yourself to make mistakes. Art is knowing which ones to keep.
Scott Adams

Every artist was first an amateur.
Ralph Waldo Emerson

A picture is a poem without words
Horace

Ground breaking for the new Thyen-Clark Cultural Center

Thyen-Clark Cultural Center sign made with colored chalk and sand.

Today was a big day for everyone in this area.  The official ground breaking for the Thyen-Clark Cultural Center was held this afternoon.  This is a true partnership between Jasper Community Arts and Jasper Public Library.  The new building will be on the site of a former factory in the downtown area near the River Walk and many other area attractions.

Thyen-Clark Cultural Center proposal. Will the doors really be ready to open by the end of 2020? Yeah!

We are so excited.  Both entities have been seeking expansion for many years, decades in fact.  I first met with the Thyens in 2006 but it wasn’t until about four years ago that the library and Jasper Arts decided that a partnership would be a great idea.

Some of the first shovels with our generous donors Jim and Pat Thyen at far right.

The road has not been easy but everyone in the community seemed to get on board with fund raising, the referendum drive for the library, approval from all the political entities, funding from state organizations.  The turning point was the challenge grant pledged by Jim and Pat Thyen.  From major companies to individuals, everyone in the area has pitched in to make this project happen.

So this afternoon, we all gathered at the site for the ground breaking ceremony.  Speeches were given, children were invited to participate, all of the board members and staff and other supporters were given an opportunity to wield one of the golden shovels.

The bulldozers take over tomorrow.

I can hardly wait!  Viva la arts!

Links to more information.

Library Director Christine Golden and Arts Director Kyle Rupert welcomed the crowd of about 100 people.

Mayor Dean Vonderheide gave a brief speech. He has been involved in the Cultural Center project before he became mayor. We’re so fortunate to have his continued leadership.

Visual Arts Coordinator Emily Colucci Peake decorated the honorary shovels, an artist’s brush and a stack of books. How clever!

Gumby put in an appearance. Here he is posing with Corina and Juan Mack. Corina is special Project Coordinator for the arts.

Peppa Pig also dropped in to entertain the kids and adults.

Jasper Community Arts

Jasper Public Library

New gallery opens in the area

Traditional Arts Today gallery at 314 W 9th St, Ferdinand, IN. The brick building behind this restored historical building is the workshop space.

I had the pleasure to visit a new gallery in the area this past week.  Traditional Arts Today at 314 W 9th Street, Ferdinand, Indiana, features the art and crafts of regional artists.

Beautiful entrance to Traditional Arts Today gallery

Housed in a beautifully restored historical home, TAT is just a block off Main Street in Ferdinand, Indiana.  The gallery showcases a wide variety of creations by area artists, from painting and photography, weavings and soaps, to jewelry and pottery, and a whole lot more.  This is a great place to browse and pick up something for yourself or someone special.

Official greeters at TAT

Many homemade products are featured, from soaps to edibles. Yum!

The impressive entrance hall of the gallery.

TAT also offer classes in their restored carriage house behind the building.  All those looms you see in the photo will soon be moved there.  This weekend they offered Ukrainian Easter Egg decorating classes.

Some paintings of Louisville artists and hand-made weavings. All those looms will be moving to the workshop space soon.

If you haven’t been to Ferdinand, it’s a great place for a day trip.  Of course, you’ll see one of the main features of the village which is the monastery on top of the hill, a truly spectacular sight.  Plus there are many other shops and small restaurants though out the town.

Some pottery by Monte Young with local photographs and handmade pillows.

Anyway, check out Traditional Arts Today gallery.  Their Facebook page is Traditional Arts Today and they’re just getting their website up but that should be ready soon.  It’s always heartening to hear of a new arts venue opening in the area.

Follow these links to learn more:

Traditional Arts Today  website

Facebook – Traditional Arts Today

Monastery of the Immaculate Conception

Ferdinand, Indiana activities

A sad day for arts magazines

I love arts magazines.  Looking at all those gorgeous photos of the artwork of other artists is so inspiring.  I’ve learned so much over the years. But there is a downside to all the magazines, and that is that I never wanted to throw them away.  I know, I know, they’re just meant to be temporary but most artists I know feel this way. We always think we’ll come back to them but we don’t.  That still doesn’t change the allure these shiny missives of creativity.

But I noticed something the last time I went to a bookstore.  You know that I live in a really rural area so visiting a brick and mortar bookstore is a treat for me.  I love the smell of new print, fondling volumes of wonderful possibilities, smelling the coffee and just hanging around with other book-lovers. But the last time I visited my favorite big name bookstore, I headed to the magazine rack at the end of my visit to peruse the latest offerings in art magazines and to snag a couple for home reading.  After digging through the layers, looking behind the home decorating and wrestling mags, I couldn’t find some of my favorites.  I thought that maybe it was the end of the month and the new editions hadn’t been put out yet.

So I was dismayed to read one of my favorite blogs by artist James Gurney (Gurney Journey) yesterday and to learn that F & W Publications, Inc., the company that produces The Artists Magazine has filed for bankruptcy.  What!?!  This magazine has been a staple for artists across the country for decades.  When I purchased a copy, I would read it from cover to cover.  Even the ads in the back listed announcements of exhibits and other great information.  Sigh.  This will make my next visit to the bookstore a little dimmer.  Yes, there are some other fine art magazines out there but they have a different mission and flavor than The Artists Magazine.  Oh, and Writers Digest,  Pastel Journal, Watercolor Artist, and Interweave Knits are going, too.

Read more here:

http://gurneyjourney.blogspot.com/

https://www.adweek.com/digital/this-publisher-thought-ecommerce-was-its-savior-now-its-dead/

How to enter a digital portfolio review

Krempp Gallery, Jasper Indiana

I am on the Visual Arts Committee for the arts center for which I used to be Director.  The committee is charged with selecting exhibits for the following year.  We do twelve exhibits a year with some being fixed so generally we have slots for seven or eight shows.  Some of these are solo shows and some are group exhibits.  A few are invitationals based on a theme, ex, portraits, furniture, costume design, etc.

Each December we put out a call for artists with the deadline for entry the following March.  Then the committee, comprised of artists, teachers, gallery owners, and interested community members review the entries and begin to winnow them down.  We’re seeking talent, variety in both style and media, and often something just plain different.

What initially began as slide submissions quickly morphed into digital images on CD which has again transitioned to reviewing all the artists in an online forum.  This week I’ve looked at over fifty artists.  (The first year we put out a call we had over two hundred entries!)

One thing that has struck me is how some artists clearly project a professionalism that others do not.  This gives them a big advantage in the review process.  So, just what do I mean by this?

  1. Follow the rules.  If you’re asked to submit ten images, then don’t submit three or twenty. Check the size and format that is requested.  If an Artist’s Statement or CV is requested, then send one. DO NOT send a link to your web site or a photo of your fancy brochure.  You want to make it easy for the judges and they shouldn’t have to go fishing for information.
  2. Check your photos very carefully. Is the quality up to par or could you do better?  There are all kinds of resources online or YouTube about how to take decent photos of your artwork.  You don’t want any hot spots, frames, hands holding the work, your dog or the garage door in the image. With affordable digital cameras and editing software, there is no excuse for submitting shabby images.
  3. Check your computer monitor and view your images on different monitors. If you’re really serious, invest in a monitor calibrator.  This will help ensure that your images appear the same across many platforms.
  4. What work should you submit? Obviously, your best, but more than that.  Ask yourself if your work is consistent in quality and impact?  Or does it look like everyone else’s work?  Is everything too same same or are you working in a distinguishing style?  Usually first impressions count so I would suggest lining up your work with your best piece first and your second best piece last in order to make the impression stick. What makes your work stand out?  Yes, it may be very well executed but it just may not have that special something.  Try to be objective.
  5. If you are working in more than one style or medium, it is OK to submit more than one portfolio with each submission focusing on a different style or medium. However, that means that should your work be accepted for an exhibit, then your show will be focused on the work that was submitted.  Gallery directors understand that the exact pieces you submit for review may no longer be available (unless that was one of the rules), but they expect to see you deliver a show similar in style and content to what was in your application.
  6. Learn to write a decent Artist Statement. Can you explain your work in half a page or less?
  7. When you are writing your CV (curricula vitae), start with the newest items first.  If you have many, many listings, then highlight some of your most important awards or shows.  Summarize the earlier work.  Believe me, no one is interested in what you did in kindergarten.

After you submit your portfolio, then relax.  You either will or you won’t get in.  It’s out of your hands. But learn from the process.  It’s OK to contact the gallery or museum to find out if there was anything you could improve or for other helpful suggestions.

You can often find request for portfolios in the back of many artists’ magazines and through online resources, such as, CaFE.org.  Some charge a fee and some do not.  Again, read the rules.  And if you should get accepted for an exhibit, pay particular attention to the conditions and rules of the gallery.  But that is a subject for another post.

Read more about submitting your work for a juried show at this link to an earlier post.    5 Tips for Getting into a Juried Show

Fresh flowers for spring!

Are you tired of winter and ready for something new?  Try adding some fresh flower paintings to your home for a new look.  Both of my Etsy shops are having a sale of 20% off ALL flower paintings or even any painting with some flowers in it.  No limit except for the time.  Sale ends April 30th.  Check out the links below.

Etsy KitMiracleArt  click here!

Etsy shop My90Acres click here!

Spring sale. 20% off all flower paintings or any painting with flowers in it. No limit. All in my Etsy shop KitMiracleArt.

Spring ad for Etsy shop my90acres. 20% off all flower paintings. All original. No limit.

Mixed Bouquet

Mixed Bouquet, original painting, 20 x 16, impressionistic style, Kit Miracle

Spring is finally ready to pop here in Southern Indiana.  The early daffodils and crocuses are out in force.  The tulips are up but not yet blooming.  I’m not sure if the narcissus will make it after the deep freeze  a week ago but the forsythias are ready to pop.

Meanwhile I’m still in the mood to paint flowers which finds me scouring my old photos.  This painting was based on a small bouquet of mixed zinnias from my garden.  I think the greens are sprigs of coriander with added bits of phlox and sweet peas.

Painting flowers is much more challenging than most people realize.  Some artists are so talented in painting every pistol and stamen but that is not my style. I prefer to capture the feel of the flower.  This is called impressionism.

As you can see if you view the detail photos, brush strokes are a mix of bold and soft.  It takes some practice to achieve this effect but all I can advise is to keep at it.  Or, wipe it off or paint over any less than desirable areas.

Mixed Bouquet, detail 1. Another closeup of the flowers. Loosely painted in impressionistic style.

Mixed Bouquet, detail 2. Notice the loose strokes and variegated painting.

Mixed Bouquet, original painting, Kit Miracle

This painting can be viewed on my Etsy shop here.

When you take a flower into your hand and really look at it, it’s your world for the moment. I want to give that world to someone else.  Most people in the city rush around so, they have no time to look at a flower.  I want them to see it, whether they want to or not. 

      Georgia O’Keeffe