Keeping an art journal

Last year I talked about taking a sketchbook with you wherever you go.  (September 2019) But today I’d like to elaborate on that a little. 

A day at the lake. Loved the fall colors which were more brilliant than I could capture. Many of the boats are readied for winter but there was still a fair amount of traffic on the lake for a beautiful fall day. This is the elongate sketchbook, about 5 x 7, opened to 5 x 14, perfect for landscapes.

This week the temperatures were up in the 80s here in southern Indiana.  My husband and I decided to take the day off (heh heh) and go to the lake.  We took breakfast sandwiches.  He fished while I painted.  Later, as we were waiting for the paint to dry, I showed him some of my other sketches over the years.

This particular book is an elongated one, perfect for landscapes.  I’ve captured scenes from vacations and travels in many places over the years.  He asked if I would ever consider selling the book. After a little thought, I replied, no. It has too many memories. 

One word of advice.  Date your sketch and make a note of where it was done.  Our memories get fuzzy over time and this really helps.

Gare de Lyon. One often has plenty of time to wait in airports and train stations, but this was one of the more beautiful ones that I have been in. What you can’t see are the jillions of people milling about, on their way here and there.

The primary difference between a sketchbook and an art journal (in my mind) is that the journal may have much more extensive writing, like a diary, along with sketches, and even things that have been glued inside.  One of mine has the label for a special chocolate shop in Paris.  I will visit that if I ever go there again.  And I sure would not have remembered exactly where it was.  Tickets, photos, postcards…even pressed flowers have all ended up in my art journals.

This is a view of Avignon taken from the hill where the Palais des Papes is. I later used this in a large watercolor painting.

You may wish to keep a running commentary in your various journals.  But one thing that I’ve found really enjoyable is to create a dedicated book for a special trip or event. 

A museum visit in Paris. I wanted to remember the general layout of these paintings and they didn’t allow photographs. So, I made sketches. AND…recorded the artists’ names.

One of my favorites is a bicycle tour I took through Provence a number of years ago.  The journal wasn’t very large, only about 5 x 7, but was easy to slip into a purse or my bike pack.  And it really turned out to be more of a diary with sketches than a sketchbook.  But it has been so fun to pull it out every once in awhile just to read about my trip and think about where I was when I made the sketches. 

I loved this small marble bust of a boy with a wreath in his hair. Sketched at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in NYC. You have to get used to people leaning over your shoulder when sketching in a crowd, but really, most people are very polite and may not even notice you at all.

I know we are all feeling the angst of staying at home these days, but do you have any ideas for an art journal?  Maybe a gardening one or something dedicated to the holidays?  What do you see out of your window?  Activities at the park?  Let your imagination roam. 

Picasso exhibit at the Guggenheim. It was truly a memorable exhibit, but again, no photographs. I completed several sketches under the watchful eyes of the security guards.

There are a number of books about art journaling which might give you a few ideas. Here is one of my favorites by Danny Gregory. He has actually written several books on the subject. Check them out here.

An Illustrated Journey: Inspiration from the Private Art Journals of Traveling Artists, Illustrators, and Designers.

Pumpkins! Pumpkins! Pumpkins!

Ever since our visit to the pumpkin patch a few weeks ago, I have been obsessed with painting pumpkins.  Well, this has gone on long before that visit, but there is just something about the shapes and colors, the many varieties of these humble squashes that appeals to me.

Pumpkin Head – final painting, oil on linen, 29.25 x 36, Kit Miracle, Halloween theme, telling a story

The first pumpkins that I painted were several years ago in a large painting of my granddaughter and son carving pumpkins.  I posted the “how to” of that painting here.  Pumpkin Head presented many challenges.  When my granddaughter wanted a happy face, my son replied, “No, they’re born as pumpkins but they die as scary jack o’ lanterns.”  A bit macabre sense of humor, I’d say.

Fall still life set up.
Little Turk. Love the shape and warty bumps on these pumpkins.
Big orange pumpkin with sunflowers.

Since then, I’ve painted little white ones and little orange ones, and pumpkin buddies.  Pumpkins with flowers and leaves.  And some larger pumpkins.  I know it’s not “high art”, whatever that is. But it amused me this autumn.  But I think I’m done.  They’ve sold well in my Etsy shop and some local shops.  I guess that I’m not the only person who loves pumpkins.

Little White. I did two of these and they both sold instantly. Guess white pumpkins are popular this year.
Two Pumpkins. This is one of the older paintings of these little friends.
Pumpkin friends. The small squash is actually more yellow than orange but this is the way it turned out.

Back to prepping canvases for the larger series. 

Or…maybe something else.

Fall decorations on the farm. My husband’s old 1952 Allis-Chalmers tractor all gussied up for the studio sale a few years ago. He even washed it! And this was his idea entirely.

Sunday Breakfast, Blueberry Pancakes! Yummm!

Sunday breakfast with blueberry pancake, oven-cooked bacon, and fresh oranges.

Normally I stick with a light breakfast – fruit and yogurt, fruit smoothie, oatmeal, etc.  But on Sundays we go a bit overboard.  My husband loves to cook big breakfasts.  Sometimes I even get to put in an order.  So today I asked for his out-of-this-world blueberry pancakes.  They are so good.  One is enough for a normal person but you could eat two if you really want to get stuffed.

He uses fresh blueberries which really makes them special.  And cooks them one at a time on the ancient griddle he inherited from his father.  Probably at least eighty years old and seasoned just right.  Yes, I’ve got another griddle, and yes, this takes a lot of time, but it’s his show so this is what he does.

Blueberry pancake on the ancient family griddle.

My husband insists on real maple syrup but I’m a product of my childhood and like the cheap stuff made with all those things we’re not supposed to eat these days.  Left over pancakes are frozen on a cookie sheet and then put in a bag for future breakfasts.  The recipe below makes about fifteen large pancakes.

By the way, for you bacon lovers out there, if you’re not cooking your bacon in the oven, you are really missing the show.  Perfect every time and not greasy at all.

Here’s the recipe (adapted from Pete’s Scratch Pancakes.)

Ingredients:

                2 cups flour

                3 tablespoons sugar

                ½ teaspoon salt

                1 tablespoon baking powder

                2 eggs, beaten separately before adding

                ¼ cup melted butter

                1 ¾ cup milk

                1 teaspoon vanilla

                couple of generous shakes cinnamon

                1 cup blueberries

Directions

Mix the dry items first.

Combine the eggs and melted butter to the milk and slowly stir into the flour mixture.

Add the vanilla, cinnamon and berries.

Heat the griddle to325 F or the pan to medium high let sit at least 10 minutes while heating the griddle or pan.

Oven bacon

                Preheat oven to about 380.

                Arrange bacon strips on rack on cookie sheet with sides. (otherwise the grease will run all over the place. )

                Cook until desired crispiness. 

                When you’re done, there will be a lot of grease in the pan.  You can either carefully pour this off into a container or put it in the fridge to harden, then scrape it off.

What’s on the Bookshelf? Artists’ Biographies

I don’t write too many book reviews on this blog but that’s mostly because I read A LOT!  Two or three books a week, and have several going at the same time.  I write tons of reviews for Amazon, probably in excess of 1,000 and that is NOT everything that I read or use either. 

But I thought I’d share with you my thoughts about some artist biographies that I’ve read recently.  These are not art books but actual biographies or autobiographies.  Some I liked; some not so much.  I have eclectic tastes.

Norman Rockwell: My Adventures as an Illustrator, the Definitive Edition

The first one that I would highly recommend is Norman Rockwell’s autobiography My Adventures as an Illustrator.  He actually recorded his thoughts on a Dictaphone in 1960  and then it was pulled together by his son Tom.  It is an enjoyable read.  Rockwell is so humorous and self-deprecating.  I always love to see how people became who they eventually became and this is a great book which follows Rockwell’s life from beginning to end.  There are many illustrations and drawings in this tome but that is not the main focus.  It’s a huge book at 500+ pages printed on thick paper.  Best not to fall asleep in bed with it as you could get hurt if it falls on you.

Carl Larsson: The Autobiography of Sweden’s Most Beloved Artist

Another favorite painter of mine is the Swedish painting Carl Larsson.  I fell in love with his work when I first encountered his beautifully illustrated books over forty years ago.  This autobiography is well-translated making it immensely easy to read.  Another artist who came up from difficult circumstances to become a national treasure.  The book is illustrated with many of his original sketches.

Edward Hopper in Vermont by Bonnie Toucher Clause

Edward Hopper in Vermont by Bonnie Toucher Clause.  I am a big Hopper fan.  Generally I love the feeling of the lonely soul which he seems to be able to impart in many of his paintings.  But he is also known for his landscapes and street scenes.  Unfortunately, I wasn’t a huge fan of this book.  The author basically focuses on a small series of watercolor paintings that Hopper did during his time in Vermont.  (I should mention here that many artists escaped the city during the 20s, 30s, and 40s, if not permanently, then at least for the summers.)  Frankly, the book reads like a senior thesis.  Not necessarily my favorite.  It does have some black and white illustrations.

The Art of Rivalry by Sebastian Smee

The Art of Rivalry: Four Friendships, Betrayals and Breakthroughs in Modern Art by Sebastian Smee.  I enjoyed reading this book very much as the author writes about four pairs of artists who were contemporaries.  Matisse and Picasso.  Manet and Degas.  Pollock and de Kooning.  Freud and Bacon.  Although I was familiar with all of these artists, some more than others, the author delves deeply into their influences, jealousies, rivalries, and the times in which they were making art.  Frankly there were a few artists that I didn’t really like so much after I read this book but, hey, that is why we read, isn’t it?

Rosa Bonheur by Anna Klumpke

Rosa Bonheur  by Anna Klumpke, The Artist’s [auto] Biography.  I have always been an admirer or Rosa Bonheur’s paintings, particularly some of her large animal paintings.  But, well, this book is a bit dull.  Typically, it follow’s Bonheur’s early life and how she got into painting.  Then entered her companion Anna Klumpke who writes a good deal about Bonheur’s life.  Supposedly it was nearly dictated to her, or Anna had a photographic memory for what Rosa relayed to her. Overall, written in very stilted and flowery language, it takes perseverance to get through the entire book.

Finally, I’m going to recommend two videos/movies about a couple of my favorite artists.

David Hockney: A Bigger Picture

The first one is David Hockney: A Bigger Picture.  I first saw this film on TV and then purchased the DVD.  I’m a huge Hockney fan.  No, I don’t paint anything like him but I’ve always admired how he keeps reinventing himself.  He doesn’t seem afraid to follow whatever rabbit trail he is on, from his early California paintings to several years experimenting with  copier prints.   In this film biography, Hockney returns to England and gets caught up in loads of plein air paintings, including one on a grand scale (the size of a warehouse wall) which he donated to the British National Gallery.  The film is worth watching several times just to hear Hockney’s thought processes, his humor and his own challenges. 

At Eternity’s Gate. Final years of Vincent Van Gogh.

Finally, if you haven’t seen Willem Defoe’s portrayal of Van Gogh in At Eternity’s Gate you have really missed something. I’m sure your local library will have a copy or you can probably catch it on one of the on-demand channels.  The film depicts Van Gogh’s final years in Provence, his time with Gaugin, and the influence of his brother Theo.  So beautifully shot, you will want to watch it more than once.

So, if you’re interested in learning more about your favorite artists, these are a few biographies that I would like to recommend.  Please check out an earlier post where I had other recommendations. 

Soft days of autumn

View of Madison, Indiana, from the inn. It’s a quaint, arty little town about forty minutes up the river from Louisville. I wanted to get a photo of the sunrise in the morning but the whole river valley was fogged in. Couldn’t see a foot in front of myself.

The soft days of autumn seem to be sneaking up on us. From temperatures in the 80s a week ago, to lows in the 50s and even 40s now.  I love autumn with the smell of wood smoke and newly fallen leaves.  The golden sunshine and the reds and yellows of the leaves.  Everything seems to be winding down…but not quite yet.

This is the view from the Clifty Falls Inn. That is the Ohio River and Kentucky on the other side. Another week or two, and those hills will be ablaze with color.

My husband and I visited Clifty Falls State Park in Madison, Indiana.  This 1400 acre park sits on the banks of the Ohio river and boasts some beautiful views of the river scenes, foliage, and the town of Madison. There is some great hiking here, too.  Unfortunately, with the dry September, the falls weren’t running so we’ll have to plan a visit for another time.

The variety of pumpkins and gourds at the farm was amazing. I could have brought home three times as many. But they provide a little fall color for the season. And in the end, get tossed into the chicken pen. The ladies are very appreciative.

We just spent one night at the inn but it was a pleasant getaway.  On our return, it seemed as if the leaves had begun changing colors overnight.  We stopped to buy pumpkins at the Cornucopia Family Farm.  This was our first visit but apparently they have many visitors from a wide area.  Whole families were there for the hayrides and popcorn, children’s activities and, well, to buy pumpkins.  I have never seen so many varieties.  I wanted them all but had to restrain myself.

We discovered this beautiful little country church as we were looking for the pumpkin farm.

As we drove home on the country backroads, we saw little churches and just enjoyed the day.  There were several Amish buggies on the roads.  It was Saturday, after all.  Just so relaxing to be out and about.

Late garden harvest of loads of peppers and a few tomatoes. Plenty more peppers to pick, too!

Summer tasks are winding down here on the farm.  The garden has about had it but I’m a hold out for the last green bean.  Still have plenty of peppers to pick as well as the sweet potatoes.  And the zinnias which I grow for cutting are still vibrant. Some of them are taller than me!

Firewood. This is nice, dry and seasoned firewood and splits easily. The basement is already stacked but there’s plenty more wood to split.

It’s time to put away the fishing gear. Although, really, does the season ever end? The impatiens and coleus are getting a little leggy.

The leaves are starting to turn and drop.  We usually just grind them up with the mower for mulch.  And our stack of winter firewood is growing.  We share a log splitter with the neighbor which is great for gnarly old pieces of wood.  But the boys actually like to split the wood by hand with a maul.  There is a lot more skill to this than it looks, requiring just the right swinging rhythm and twist of the wrist.  It’s nice of them to come out and help the old man out once in awhile.

The zinnias that I use for cutting are still going strong. Some of them are taller than me! In the background are the desiccated stalks of the sunflowers that the goldfinches have stripped. And those poles on the left hold motion sensitive lights which help scare away the night critters. Sometimes.

The next month will find me out tidying up the place before it gets too cold.  Maybe sitting by the firepit with a hot beverage and a book.  I hope you have a quite place to retreat, too.  Enjoy the season.

The last rose. Well maybe, maybe not. Sometimes I bring this little beauty inside in the winter just to enjoy the beautiful perfume on a cold day.

Six ideas for pricing your artwork

What should you charge for your artwork, your hours, days, weeks and more of effort and agony?  This is a question that every artist considers, at least at some time during their career.  This is, of course, assuming that you are willing to part with one of your creations, your children.

The first painting that I ever sold was when I was in high school.  My art teacher was preparing our pieces for an upcoming state show for students.  The actual painting was an illustration of The Ballad of the Harp-Weaver. One of her friends had seen it at her home where she was matting the works.  On the recommendation of my art teacher, I was offered $50 for it which was a whole lot of babysitting money back then.

Needless to say, this set me on the path to thinking that I could actually make some money from something that I had created.  But it was a decade before I actually began to pursue my art in such light and sold it.

Pricing your artwork is a tricky proposition and one that attracts many opinions and much advice.  After thirty-five years in the business, these are some of the considerations that I use to price my paintings.

1  Materials and costs

Obviously any business person can tell you that you need to cover your costs.  This includes overhead, such as, rent, utilities, computer services and websites. Include your equipment to make your work – easels, kilns, brushes, even your vehicle if you need to transport it.  Materials like clay, canvases, paints, drawing materials count, too.

You need to eat and keep a roof over your head and pay the kids’ orthodontist’s bills so you must pay yourself a salary.  Hopefully, you can eventually do this solely with your art but you may need to take a part-time job here and there.  The whole point is that the more time you can spend creating, the more money you can make.

If you are not tracking your costs you need to start doing this right now.  You are in business so get a sales tax license and be professional.  After a year or two, you’ll have a pretty good idea of what you need to bring in to cover your expenses.  Everything above that is profit.

2  Size matters

Frankly, I think the bigger the painting, the more you should charge for it.  You may have more work in a smaller painting, but the show pieces are generally the largest.  Customers expect to pay more for size. Plus, you have more materials in them.

I created a chart which quickly gives me the ballpark figure for the size of painting that I have to what I should charge for it.  I may not always stick with this, but it gives me a starting place. Price calculator

3  Talent and skill

Be realistic.  Your mother may have told you how wonderful you are and what a great artist you are.  But, take a look around.  How does your work compare to others, especially in your area and medium.  I have seen so many artists who just come on the scene and start attaching really high prices to their work, only to be disappointed when nothing sells.

Maybe you are one of the gifted people who will command high prices right from the beginning, but most artists do not.  It’s always easier to raise your prices than to fumble around and lower them.

4  Location

Where you live and where you sell your work can have a significant impact on the fees you can charge for your work.  In big cities, especially the coasts, the audience is expecting to pay more.  Galleries and museums have their own overhead to cover and, of course, higher rents in metropolitian areas.

In most rural areas, it’s difficult to command the same price structure.  Cost of living and wages are lower, thus people expect to pay less.  For the most part, not always.

Art fairs are mostly entertainment but few visitors are going to shell out thousands for a painting at most art fairs.  This also includes street artists so set your prices accordingly.

There are some caveats with this theory.  With the internet, artists can live in low rent areas but sell across the country, indeed the world.  But again, most people are not going to spend big money on something they haven’t seen in person.

5  Awards and shows

If you are an award-winning artist and have lots of credentials as well as significant shows and exhibitions, you can command higher fees.  You have proven your worth and the customer can feel comfortable that they are buying something from someone with good credentials.  Do you belong to any special art societies?  List them on your resume or website.

I was fortunate that my work was exhibited in some really good shows when I was still pretty early in my career.  I didn’t even know how good they were then but am pretty proud to list them on my website now.

6  Age

No, not your age.  The age of the pieces you still have hanging around your studio.  If it’s something fresh, maybe a new style or direction, stick with your best prices.  However, if you’ve got that box of photographs that you took twenty years ago gathering dust under your bed, do yourself a favor and price them to sell.  Yes, they really may be worth what you originally priced them at, but if you sell them, then you will at least recover some of your expenses and can use the money for more materials to create new work.

I will sometimes host a studio sale where I’ll invite local and regional friends out for a weekend.  I’ll clear my studio of most furniture, set up all the paintings that I want to move, and put some really attractive prices on them.  I usually do this in the fall before holiday shopping takes off.  And I always have some music, food and beverages for an added attraction.  I picked up this idea from a potter friend of mine who would unload his summer inventory every autumn.

I have another friend who actually rented the high school auditorium and set up thousands of paintings to move.  He made $50K that weekend!  I don’t make nearly that much but it’s good to make some extra dough around the holidays and clear some room for new work.

Occasionally I will have an online sale but I don’t want to do that too often.  My patrons should realize that I charge a reasonable price and shouldn’t wait around for the sales.

7  Bonus point.   Be fair

Make sure the prices you list on your website are the same you’re charging in a gallery or somewhere else.  The quickest way to lose a gallery is to undercut their prices.  I give my galleries some leeway to negotiate prices or to bundle sales.  Everyone comes out happy.

These are some of my suggestions for setting prices for your artwork.  You’ll probably find some helpful or maybe you’ll create your own set of rules.  Whatever you do, remember to keep creating and have fun!

Something a little different

I’ve been taking a break for the past several weeks from working on my current series of paintings Intimate Spaces: Breaking Bread.  Although I tend to be pretty disciplined when I’m working on a big project, sometimes I need a respite.  Recently I’ve returned to some old themes, particularly western scenes and my travels.  Culling through a couple of decades’ worth of old photos, scenes that I may have skipped previously, now draw me in.  It doesn’t always have to be the entire picture, just a small portion of it.  And I always feel free to change things around.

Atrium at Longwood Gardens, du Pont estate, Pennsylvania. Acrylic on canvas, 16 x 20, impressionistic style, Kit Miracle

Here are a couple of my most recent paintings from my travels.  The first one is of the Atrium at Longwood Gardens on the du Pont estate in Pennsylvania.  Although I visited in March of that year, it was still beautiful.  The gardens under glass were particularly impressive. Touted as the most beautiful garden in America, I couldn’t disagree.

Garden Cherub, acrylic on canvas, 20 x 16. Pittsburgh, PA Kit Miracle

The second painting is from a different trip to Pennsylvania, Pittsburgh to be exact.  One of our favorite places to visit is The Strip District, a multi-block area of food shops and restaurants, fish markets and collectibles.  This particular shop had some very enticing items in the front of the shop, but as I walked through the store to the back, they had a garden shop with rusty gates and ironwork, birdbaths and outdoor trellises.  I loved this little garden cherub.  Now I wish I had purchased him but at least I could capture him in paint.

Both of these paintings are painted on red-toned canvases which peeks through, adding another layer of liveliness to the scenes.

In case you are interested, these are both available in my Etsy shop KitMiracleArt.  AND….I’m having a 20% off Labor Day sale through Monday.  Free shipping, too.

After School, 96th Hoosier Salon Exhibit

After School, acrylic on canvas, 30 x 30 Kit Miracle This painting is currently on exhibit at the 96th Annual Hoosier Salon show at the Indiana State Museum through October 25th, 2020.

I’m thrilled to have my painting After School on exhibit at the 96th Annual Hoosier Salon exhibit at the Indiana State Museum.

This painting depicts two girls having a snack after school.  I assumed that they were in band or cheerleaders as they were dressed alike.  I was attracted to the silhouette shape of the figures.  Despite the high contrast of the figures against the light background, the painting itself actually has a lot of color.  Notice the distinctive color outlines.  These are painted before the rest of the painting, however, sometimes I go back and reemphasize the colors.

The background is painted very loosely and doesn’t really include any details except the umbrella.  It’s always as important to know what to leave out as well as what to include.  More details, parking lot, would not have added anything to the painting, just more distraction.

This is another painting in my Intimate Spaces: Breaking Bread series.

After School, detail 1. Acrylic on canvas.

After School, detail 2

The painting is currently on exhibit at the Indiana State Museum.  The exhibit opens tomorrow, Saturday, August 29th with free admission.  It runs through October 25th.  You can find the Indiana State Museum at 650 W Washington St, Indianapolis.  There is so much to see at the museum it’s certainly worth the trip.  A great outing for kids and adults.  And it’s right next door the the Eiteljorge Museum of Native American and Western Art, too!

If you can’t visit the museum in person, here is a link to the exhibit online.  All the works are for sale, of course.

Pet menagerie

This post is about our menagerie of pets currently residing on the home place.  We’ve had several dogs, a few cats, and now a feathered friend.  Two of the pets arrived this year.

Cheeky the parakeet loves to have his cage rolled outdoors on nice days. In the shade, of course.

First there was the addition of Cheeky the parakeet.  This is the first time that we’ve had an indoor bird so a bit different from the flocks of chickens we’ve had.  Cheeky loves to have his cage rolled out onto the back porch where he can survey the yard.  He gets excited when he sees other birds but otherwise seems happy.  He particularly likes to have some grass and clover added to his feed.  And when he gets going, he gives the most interesting concert of warbles and chirps.

Leo at a few weeks old. Ready for adventure.

Leo begging to sit in my lap while I paint. Not happening. But look at those eyes!

Leo taking a cat nap in my studio, right under my easel.

Leo the cat is our newest addition in June.  I wasn’t prepared to have another cat after our old one died at the ripe old age of twenty-two.  But, well, he was really cute.  Leo has become a “mom” cat as he follows me wherever I go.  He particularly likes hanging around in my studio.  We initially had some disagreements on what he could climb on and what was off limits.  Some firm scolding and a squirt bottle seems to have solved that problem.

Mikey the border collie. I can hardly take a picture outdoors without him photo bombing it. At least a tail or head or something.

Mikey in his favorite chair on the patio. Doesn’t look comfortable to me but he likes it.

Finally, there is Mikey the dog.  Border collie to be more precise.  This is our second border collie.  They are very smart dogs but have really strong personalities.  They like to herd everything, including when I push the wheelbarrow around the yard.  He also photo bombs nearly every single outdoor photo that I take.  How does he know?  Mikey is a great guard dog.  His job this time of year is keeping the raccoons out of the corn patch.

So, that’s our pet family.  Not about art although I predict they will appear in some future paintings.  Mikey already has.

Bread, a new painting

Bread, acrylic on canvas, 16 x 20. The Food We Eat Series. Kit Miracle This series is all about food. We’re all a little bit obsessed, I think. But what is better than fresh made bread, still warm from the oven? Ah, the aroma. The crunch of the crust when it is cut.

Who doesn’t love the aroma of fresh bread?  The crunch of the crust and soft texture of the body?

This week as I was waiting for more canvases to be delivered for my latest series, I spent some time doing some smaller paintings.  This is another painting for The Food We Eat series.  I guess since we’re all isolated at present, my thoughts return to food.  Must be an animal thing.

My husband makes this lovely, crusty bread.  I’ve posted the recipe in a previous post.  It is very easy and so so delicious.  It makes great toast and bruschettas. I think he’s making French toast for breakfast this morning with the last of this loaf.  https://my90acres.com/2018/03/28/crusty-artisan-bread/

Bread, detail. It is often difficult to convey in the pictures that I post the brushwork and the texture of the paint. Just click on the picture and expand it to see. You will notice that I actually use very loose brush strokes for much of the painting. Again, as mentioned in my last post, the viewer’s eye fills in many details.

As I was waiting for a frame to arrive for a painting which needed to be delivered this week, I painted this and three other smaller pieces.  One plein air and two landscapes.  The frame never arrived, due to delays at the factory due to COVID.  So I had a good friend make a frame but that’s a story for another day.

Anyway, if you’re not doing anything today and you’d like to surprise your family, or just yourself, try your hand at some homemade bread.  You won’t be sorry.