Monthly Archives: April 2019

Spring has finally arrived

I haven’t always had luck with tulips. They’re like candy to the deer. I planted these last fall right next to my studio. Mikey the dog will keep the critters at bay.

Spring has finally arrived in this part of Southern Indiana.  It’s so beautiful that it takes my breath away.  Remember that crayon you used to have in your box called Spring Green?  Well, it’s all over the place now. At this old homestead (over 130 years), there are many established flowers and trees.  Plus we’ve added many more in the three decades that we’ve lived here.

So I thought you’d just enjoy a walk in the country.  Some of these flowers and trees are already on the wain while others have yet to bloom, the redbuds and dogwoods are just coming out now.  Maybe another post about them later.

An in and out day with the scudding clouds chasing the sunshine. I love the spring greens.

Little pansies are so cheerful. These came from an early foray to the local garden center about a week ago. I couldn’t help myself.

A cheerful crab apple next to the garden. This is a start from the original which was a Mother’s Day present to me many years ago.

More tulips basking in the sunshine.

A friendly little toady emerging from the leftover leaves. He looks a little ragged. I expect he’d like a nice breakfast of some juicy bugs.

The east fields, still soggy from the night’s rain. More clouds and sun shadows.

Bluebells and narcissus. These have become naturalized in several spots of the yard and I have more plans to move some starts elsewhere this spring.

I love violets. They come in so many variations but these deep purple ones seem to be dominant.

The importance of preliminary work

Green and Yellow, 20 x 20, acrylic, Kit Miracle. Intimate Spaces series

I recently posted a step-by-step outline of my painting A Day at the Beach (4-10-2019). A critical part of creating a significant panting is the preliminary work. I sincerely believe that the more thought I put into the piece at the beginning, the more I can work out the problems ahead of time, and the better the final result will be.  Well, that’s my theory anyway.

Green and Yellow, detail.

This is another painting in my series Intimate Spaces, all about the territory that people carve out when they visit the beach.  In this painting, I was sitting behind a couple who staked out their space early in the day with two chairs and an umbrella.  They didn’t show up until mid-afternoon.

NOTAN sketches for Green and Yellow. This is where I work out basic shapes and composition. As you can see, initially I intended this to be a rectangle shape but then changed it to a square shape.

I liked the near silhouette of the couple with the contrast of the kids playing in the surf in front of them. Maybe they were grandma and grandpa.  I don’t know and never did figure it out.

Large graphite sketch of the main characters for Green and Yellow.

As with most of my paintings, I begin with a NOTAN sketch, just hard contrast of black and white to get a feel for the composition.  Then I did a large graphite sketch of the couple.  I didn’t feel a need to sketch the kids as they’re just notes really.  They were painted directly.

NOTAN sketches of past couple of paintings. Working in black and white allows me to focus on the shapes and composition.

Here are a few more examples of NOTAN sketches.  You’ll notice the one from my last post of A Day at the Beach and how I was focusing on the interlocking umbrella shapes.

More NOTAN sketches from Jump.

And the two pages of NOTAN of Jump which I created in February.  With some of the bigger pieces, I’ll also do a color sketch but not always.

The final conclusion is that no matter what style of art you create, you will often have better results if you put in more thought and work into the beginning of your work than having to correct problems later.  Indeed, sometimes you may discover that the scene or piece doesn’t merit following through.  Or you may decide to attack it from a different direction.

A Day at the Beach – Painting a Series

A Day at the Beach, final. 24 x 36, acrylic on canvas, Kit Miracle

As a working artist for over three decades, I find keeping interested in painting involves challenging myself. Sometimes this means new subject matter or new materials. Even a new location helps.  The challenges keep me inspired and allow the mental juices to flow.

My latest challenge is painting a series of paintings revolving around a day at the beach.  I love slice of life subjects, catching people going about their lives without thought of an audience. One thing I’ve noticed is that when people are at the beach, they stake out their territories, bringing the chairs and the umbrellas, the coolers and the toys.  Beach goers seem to operate under the illusion that no one can see them in their little sand kingdoms.

But the artist’s eye can.

The planned series includes vignettes of life at the beach.  Families, couples, kids playing, people just enjoying the sunshine…or totally ignoring their surroundings with their noses in books or napping.  My inspiration for these seaside paintings are John Singer Sargent, Joaquin Sorolla, and Burt Silverman.  It took a lot of effort to make their seaside paintings seem so, well, effortless.  Unstaged even though they often were. And that is the aim of this current series that I’m working on.

The painting above depicts the settling in and establishing of territory by a family.  Mom gets the lounge chairs ready while son is waiting patiently for her attention.  The composition with overlapping umbrellas and tents is like a little city, each with its own slice of life.

The beach walkers and people playing in the surf add distance and perspective to the scene.  I also chose to flatten the color of the sky (no clouds) and the foreground.  This allows the emphasis to be placed on the middle plane where all the action is.

A Day at the Beach is number six in the series.  I have sixteen planned but we’ll see.  A series is an exploration of an idea and I’ll keep at it until I don’t have anything else to say about the subject.

If you’d like to see how this painting was created, click on this link or go under the tab Artworks and click on A Day at the Beach for step-by-step photos.

Thanks for stopping by.

A little inspiration for artists

OK, I will admit it.  I’ve been goofing off this week.  Well, not really but kind of.  The weather has finally turned gorgeous.  Spring is here in force.  Flowers popping out all over.  Just checked the fruit trees and they’re ready to put on a show real soon.

I cruised Home Depot this week as I had some time between meetings in town.  Of course, the garden center attracted me like a magnet.  Which meant that I spent some time this morning planting pansies.  They’re always so cheerful.

What I’m trying to say is that I really don’t have a real post for you today.  Yes, I’m working on a big project in the studio but am not ready to reveal it yet.

What I am going to share are a few of my favorite quotes, all about art.  Be forewarned; I love quotes and have collected hundreds over the years.  They often provide me inspiration or at the very least, food for thought.  I hope they’ll inspire you, too.

More than anything, plein air is an event. It’s an event where a sporting mind can sort things out–free of town-clutter and obligation, where judgment can take as long as it takes–look three times, think twice, paint once. Leave your strokes alone. Fix that colour. Level that horizon. Stop now, stupid, she’s on the hook, pull ‘er in, put ‘er in the creel. You will live to cast again.

Robert Genn

Once you fly, you will walk with your eyes skyward. For there you have been and there you will go again.

Leonardo da Vinci

Be careful that you do not write or paint anything that is not your own, that you don’t know in your own soul.

Emily Carr

A good painting to me has always been like a friend. It keeps me company, comforts and inspires.
Hedy Lamarr

A man paints with his brains and not with his hands.
Michelangelo

All art is autobiographical. The pearl is the oyster’s autobiography.

Federico Fellini

Art enables us to find ourselves and lose ourselves at the same time.
Thomas Merton

Art is the only way to run away without leaving home.
Twyla Tharp

Creativity is allowing yourself to make mistakes. Art is knowing which ones to keep.
Scott Adams

Every artist was first an amateur.
Ralph Waldo Emerson

A picture is a poem without words
Horace

Ground breaking for the new Thyen-Clark Cultural Center

Thyen-Clark Cultural Center sign made with colored chalk and sand.

Today was a big day for everyone in this area.  The official ground breaking for the Thyen-Clark Cultural Center was held this afternoon.  This is a true partnership between Jasper Community Arts and Jasper Public Library.  The new building will be on the site of a former factory in the downtown area near the River Walk and many other area attractions.

Thyen-Clark Cultural Center proposal. Will the doors really be ready to open by the end of 2020? Yeah!

We are so excited.  Both entities have been seeking expansion for many years, decades in fact.  I first met with the Thyens in 2006 but it wasn’t until about four years ago that the library and Jasper Arts decided that a partnership would be a great idea.

Some of the first shovels with our generous donors Jim and Pat Thyen at far right.

The road has not been easy but everyone in the community seemed to get on board with fund raising, the referendum drive for the library, approval from all the political entities, funding from state organizations.  The turning point was the challenge grant pledged by Jim and Pat Thyen.  From major companies to individuals, everyone in the area has pitched in to make this project happen.

So this afternoon, we all gathered at the site for the ground breaking ceremony.  Speeches were given, children were invited to participate, all of the board members and staff and other supporters were given an opportunity to wield one of the golden shovels.

The bulldozers take over tomorrow.

I can hardly wait!  Viva la arts!

Links to more information.

Library Director Christine Golden and Arts Director Kyle Rupert welcomed the crowd of about 100 people.

Mayor Dean Vonderheide gave a brief speech. He has been involved in the Cultural Center project before he became mayor. We’re so fortunate to have his continued leadership.

Visual Arts Coordinator Emily Colucci Peake decorated the honorary shovels, an artist’s brush and a stack of books. How clever!

Gumby put in an appearance. Here he is posing with Corina and Juan Mack. Corina is special Project Coordinator for the arts.

Peppa Pig also dropped in to entertain the kids and adults.

Jasper Community Arts

Jasper Public Library