Category Archives: Uncategorized

What pigments are you using?

I was taking inventory of my paints in my studio recently and it dawned on me that I have a LOT of paint.  As I was sorting my paints into categories by color, I realized that I didn’t really know all of the various nuances of the paints I was using.  Yes, of course, I often to return to favorites and use them  frequently.  But I decided it would be helpful to have a chart of samples of each hue.

As you can see by the charts below, there can be many slight variances by manufacturer.  Some qualities you cannot actually see but you know in the “feel” of the paint, i.e., creamier, richer, stiffer, etc. Although I generally use Artist grade paints, I had accidentally ordered some Student grade paint.  You can see by the sample comparing the various Raw Sienna varieties that one is much thinner, meaning there are more fillers and less actual pigments.  It always pays to buy the best you can afford. Oh, and I had 58 different colors or brands of oil paints.

Color sample chart #1

Color sample chart #2

Other variations include how the pigments behave over time.  Some yellow or change color. Others thin, particularly something like Titanium White, which means if they are applied over a darker ground, you may find the background bleeding through over time.

While I had all my paints out, I also decided to create a few charts of the pigments that I use most frequently.  My top ten oil paints are:

  • Titanium White
  • Cadmium Lemon
  • Raw Sienna
  • Burnt Sienna
  • Sap Green
  • Winsor Green
  • Cobalt Blue
  • Cerulean Blue
  • French Ultramarine
  • Prussian Blue
  • Cadmium Red
  • Alizarin Crimson
  • Cobalt Violet
  • Ivory Black

Although it is rare that I would incorporate all of these colors into the same painting, I often try to have a cool red and a hot red, a cool blue and a hot blue, etc. Usually just one green and no black.  My favorite brand is Winsor Newton but I try some others, too.  For instance, I love Richeson’s Hansa Yellow Medium because it’s so creamy.  There are no hard and fast rules about how many paints you need, except that generally fewer colors will result in the artist creating more colors by mixing, resulting in greater harmony in the long run.

Color samples made with Cadmium Lemon

Color samples made with Titanium White

DeLallo’s Italian Market

DeLallo’s famous Italian Market

Life is not all about art and gardening and books.  Last week we went back to Pennsylvania to visit relatives and I was fortunate enough to stop in DeLallo’s Italian Market in Jeannette, PA near New Stanton.  Wow!  The place is amazing.  Best I’ve seen outside The Strip in downtown Pittsburgh.

DeLallo’s vegetable display. They tear this down every night, edit it and create the display anew.

The fruits and veggies are displayed so beautifully.  We were told that the staff takes each display apart every night, tosses any less than fresh items, and restocks the display.

The olive bar at DeLallo’s

And the olives!  I love olives.  I’ve never seen any olive bar this long and well-stocked.  Needless to say, I purchased enough to keep me happy for a long time.

The cheese display was three times this large.

Then a quick stop by the extra large cheese display. Fresh or aged, they have everything you could imagine.

My granddaughter was fascinated with the colorful and glorious bakery display.

Olive oil, anyone?

And who could decide on which olive oil to buy?  We buy by the gallon.

Yummmm. Bread!

Finally, the bread display.  The aroma carried throughout the store.

So, imagine me on my patio, glass of wine, cheese and olives, and a good book in the sunshine.  Ah, life is good.

Something Different

Times Square at Night, watercolor, India ink, Kit Miracle

The first month of retirement has been interesting.  Everyone keeps asking me, “How’s retirement?”  “I just feel like I’m on a long vacation,” I reply. And mostly that is true.  I’m starting to feel very relaxed.  Sleep better.  Crossing some things off the inevitable list.  This time of year there is so much to do in the country: finish the garden, planting, cleaning, etc.

However, I am still finding time to paint and spend in my studio.  I’ve been working on some larger figures in landscapes and have two drawn out.  I decided to take a break and work on this watercolor of Times Square at Night this week.  If you have ever been there, then you can appreciate how bright the lights are, no matter the time of day. Times Square is always awake, always exciting.  That is what I was trying to capture in this watercolor with India ink overlay.  Somewhat abstract for me but more detail would not have been beneficial.

Lifetime paid vacation

Leaving the office on the last day. Walls empty. Bulletin board empty. Most of the paperwork gone. Lots of memories.

Finally.  After years of working, I retired this week from my job as Director of a performing and fine arts center.  I can’t believe the time is finally here.  It seems as if I’ve been traveling towards this day since my first paid real job when I was sixteen.  At first it seemed it would never arrive, and then the past few months, time kept speeding up.  I did what I could to clean out and organize.  Trained my replacement as best one can in only a week.  We’ll see how he does.

But for now.  What to do?  Paid vacation for a lifetime.  My list is long but I think it’s important to have a life, not just a To Do list.  There is always something to do on the farm.

Cleaning out my studio. Painting.  Getting back into the exhibition thing.  Traveling for plein air painting events or just to travel.  Gardening. Reading.  Just kicking back.

Hopefully, you’ll see lots more work on here.

More paintings Florida Keys

The Florida Keys are the kind of place which could supply years’ worth of painting inspiration.  Here are a few more paintings of my recent trip to the Keys, based on sketches and photos.  They just have a totally different feel from the other landscapes that I work with.

 

Sunrise Florida Keys

Isabelle’s Place, oil on canvas board

Among the mangroves, Florida Keys

November sunset

November sunset

November sunset

Beautiful November sunset.  Just turning out of my drive when I caught this one.  It looks like November, doesn’t it?

Interior with Desk

Interior with Desk, Final, oil on canvas, 16 x 20, Kit Miracle

Interior with Desk, Final, oil on canvas, 16 x 20, Kit Miracle

This is a recent painting of an interior.  I’ve got step-by-step images on this page.

Interior with Desk Step by step

Monet’s Field

Monet's Fields, oil on canvas, 16 x 20, Kit Miracle

Monet’s Fields, oil on canvas, 16 x 20, Kit Miracle

This is the field next to my studio.  In the early fall, it is a riot of colors of  wild flowers.  This time of year it’s mostly purples, blues and yellows.  Of  course, as the artist, I emphasized the colors but they were pretty bright anyway.  The field was hayed earlier in the year so you’re mostly looking at goldenrod, ageratum, iron weed and Queen Ann’s lace.

Monet's Fields, original photograph

Monet’s Fields, original photograph

Sometimes you’ve just got to paint

When pigs fly. Watercolor / pen and ink, 12 x 16. Kit Miracle

When pigs fly. Watercolor / pen and ink, 12 x 16. Kit Miracle

We’ve all heard the  admonishment that you need to create art every day.  But…life gets in the way.  Jobs, family, gardening, etc.  Sometimes I find all my  have-t0′s overwhelming my urge to create.  This weekend I just had to paint.

Yesterday, before I could get overly involved in the rest of the home tasks, I trucked my painting gear out to the front yard and painted this flowerbed which has been calling me for weeks.  It seems to be a symphony of purples, mauves, and yellows this time of year.  The heat was oppressive.  The humidity was drenching.  But I had a great time.

For you gardeners out there, you’re looking at purple cone flower, bee balm, weigela, daylilies, lambs ear, and a giant yucca.  The flying pig is a bit difficult to make out but he’s one of my favorite yard statues, as he bounces on his spring in a strong breeze.  Symbol of not-quite-lost causes.

Giant Moth Mullen Watercolor/ pen and ink, 16 x 12 Kit Miracle

Giant Moth Mullen Watercolor/ pen and ink, 16 x 12 Kit Miracle

Then, this morning I decided to capture this weed, Giant Moth Mullen.  It is already 5 feet tall and will probably top 6 or 7 feet.  It has fuzzy leaves, similar to lambs ear and the most interesting curly-type leaves and stalk.  It will eventually have a tall spike of yellow flowers which in turn, will produce seeds that the goldfinches love.  Probably how it came to be growing near my cellar door.  Majestic!

BTW, I was inspired by a blog challenge by James Gurney, who held a recent competition of people who paint weeds.  This painting is not entered as it is past date, but I thought it was a perfect subject.

Peonies en Plein Air

PeoniesattheEndoftheSeason

Peonies at the end of the season. Watercolor / pen and ink. Plein air. Kit Miracle

I had a little time today after doing the heavy gardening to do this watercolor / pen and ink of our peonies.  I love them in the spring but it seems their season is always too short.  They’re gone before I really get to enjoy them.  The weather was warm but breezy with a few spritzes of rain.  I tried to capture the blowseyness of the blossoms but I’m afraid that this painting makes them look better than they are.