Category Archives: Uncategorized

God’s Light

God’s Light, beautiful cumulus nimbus clouds with rays of sun streaming down.

I went to Louisville yesterday to visit the St. James Art Fair.  I exhibited in the fair for many years but haven’t been back since I quit exhibiting. It was exciting to meet up with old friends and to see the new trends in art.  Quality art is always popular no matter the materials or subject.

The day was beautiful with temps near the 90s.  Unseasonably warm for October.  This heat can make some very unstable air and weather conditions.

On the trip home, I was admiring the beautiful cumulus nimbus cloud formations.  Gigantic fortresses of white against a brilliant blue sky.  Some of the clouds were dropping rain which was evaporating before it could hit the ground.

This is a photo of one of the clouds which I took out my window.  (Don’t try this at home, folks.)  Artists often call the rays of sunlight streaming through the clouds God’s Light. Easy to visualize but difficult to paint. I just love clouds and have painted many, so I guess this one will be on my to-do list of painting subjects in the future.

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Busy, busy, busy. An artist’s work is never done! And that’s a good thing!

This month and next month promise to be VERY busy.

The Jasper Arts annual juried show wrapped up on Friday.  I had my painting Homage to a Dead Bird in it. Have to pick it up this week.

Solo exhibit at Oakland City University, Kit Miracle

And my solo exhibit at Oakland City University was supposed to end last Friday, too.  However, I’ve been asked to extend it for a few more weeks so if you didn’t catch it, you still can through October 12th.  The fifty works in the show are a good example of what I’ve been creating the past few years and are pretty colorful.

Goldenrod – wildflower, watercolor pen and ink, Kit Miracle

My class on Flower Painting with Watercolor and Pen and Ink begins tomorrow.  I’m a little nervous since I haven’t taught a class in years.  But I’ve been painting watercolor for 35 years now and have painted hundreds of flowers so I’m sure I’ll relax.  I hope the students have a good time and learn something.

 

Then on October 11th, I’ve been asked to exhibit some of my work at one of the final Will Read and Sing for Food events.  I’m so flattered to be asked.  This is a very worthy group of volunteers who have been raising money for worthy causes for the past several years.  Music, singing, comedy, humor, editorials.  All in good fun.  I’ll be sad to see them end their rein but understand exactly how much work is involved behind the scenes for a two hour show.  Thanks, friends!

Invitation to Open Studio Sale

Example of previous open studio paintings for sale. Up to 50% off, many of them framed. Get extra 10% off if you bring the invitation card.

Good food and drink. Homemade soup, bread, and desserts.

Finally, I’m hosting an Open Studio Sale on October 20 and 21.  I haven’t had an open studio sale for four years and have a LOT of paintings for sale at some really great prices just in time for the holidays.  Two fun-filled days with art, music, food (homemade minestrone soup and homemade bread), and good friends.  Plus it’s a great time to drive out in the country to see the fall colors.

In between all these activities, there’s company coming, fall gardening activities, a wedding and other events to attend, and so much more.  Whew! I thought I retired!

If you’d like any more information about any or all of these events, please contact me.  I sent out a bunch of invitations to the Open Studio Sale but if you didn’t receive one, just ask.

Thanks so much for stopping by.

Art newsletter for Southern Indiana

New e-newsletter for regional artists

I was recently contacted by Keith Hampton, an artist new to the area. He has taken on the monumental task of starting a newsletter for regional artists.  In this case, not just visual artists, but writers and others, too.  Local arts organizations are a great way to connect with other artists, especially if you’re new to the area.  I particularly admire Mr. Hampton for taking the time and trouble to get his newsletter off the ground.

If you’re in the Southern Indiana area, sign up for his free newsletter at: http://www.itsallart.com/artistscreating.html

And contact him if you have some work which you would like him to feature in an upcoming edition.

If you’re not from this area, an online search or contacting some local galleries or arts organizations will help you to reach out and make connections with other artists in your region.

Visiting the Falls of the Ohio

Falls of the Ohio II, acrylic on canvas, 16 x 20, Kit Miracle. This view is looking back towards the shore from the beds, where the puddles reflect the cloudy sky and trees.

A couple of weeks ago my husband and I took a day trip to the Falls of the Ohio in New Albany, Indiana.  Although it’s only a short drive away, I had never been there.

The Falls of the Ohio is an Indiana state park set on the edge of the Ohio River.  It features large fossil beds which visitors can climb over.  You can view thousands of fossils right beneath your feet.  As the level of the river drops, more layers of fossils are uncovered.

Falls of the Ohio I, acrylic on canvas, 16 x 20, Kit Miracle. View from the treeline at the Falls, across the river towards Louisville. We saw a train crossing the bridge while we were there.

The day we visited was an in and out day, with showers alternating with sun.  I particularly loved the setting along the river.  The old trees, the puddles reflecting the trees, the skyline of Louisville across the river.  We even saw a train crossing the old bridge.

There is an interpretive center which has a fee but the visit to the Falls is free.  If you go there, it is a bit tricky to find but follow the signs.  Obviously it’s on the river so you will be looking for River Road.  Take a picnic lunch or travel along River Road to eat lunch at one of the many neat restaurants in the area.  You can even follow the road east to Jeffersonville to the walking bridge over the Ohio.

All in all, an enjoyable day. It’s good to try something new.

Reception at Oakland City University

Gallery exhibit at the J. Michael Dunn Gallery at Oakland City University in Oakland City, Indiana. The paintings always look so nice when the lights are set. As you can see, I really love color!

As I mentioned earlier, I have an exhibit at Oakland City University last month and through September 28th.  We had a reception today.

Friends who made it to the reception. Even with the leftover remnants of the hurricane rain, some people still made it out. Thanks so much!

I was so delighted that some new and old friends were able to make it as we have had some real rainy weather with the remnant of the hurricane coming up from the Gulf. (We had over seven inches of rain yesterday!)  It would have been real embarrassing if no one had shown up.

My son and his girlfriend speaking with a long-time acquaintance LaVonne Tisdale.

My friend Roger Willis and his helpers put out some nice refreshments.  People hung around for my gallery talk.  Difficult to squeeze thirty-five years into twenty minutes but I hope they enjoyed it.

The artist posing with a self portrait with still life. A bit ironic, I think.

Thanks so much for coming out.  The show runs through September 28th.  If you’re in the neighborhood, please try to stop by.  Check out the hours and address at the J. Michael Dunn Gallery on campus.

Crusty Artisan Bread

Crusty Artisan Bread

It’s been a raw and unpredictable March with rain, wind, snow, what have you.  If you’re still stuck indoors, here is a VERY EASY and VERY GOOD bread recipe. My husband is the bread maker around here and has many favorites, but this one seems to be a hit with everyone.

Don’t be afraid.  Just do it!  You don’t even have to touch the dough or knead it.  Perfect crusty artisan bread.

Ingredients

  • 5 cups of flour
  • 2 1/2 cups of water
  • 2 teaspoons of salt
  • 1 ½ teaspoons of dry yeast

Day 1

Combine all the ingredients in a large bowl and stir to incorporate.  Cover well with plastic wrap.  Let sit out on the counter overnight (12-18 hours).

Bread in enamel pan

Day 2

You will need an enamel roaster pan with lid.  This should be small size.  The old speckled kind that your grandma used to have will be fine. (Our pan is elongated but a round one works fine, too.)

  • Put the roaster pan and lid into a cold oven.
  • Turn on the heat to 450 degrees
  • When the oven reaches 450 degrees, take out the pan (carefully) and sprinkle with corn meal. (No grease or oil.)
  • Pour the bread mixture into the hot pan, replace lid and bake for 30 minutes
  • Remove the lid and bake another 20 minutes
  • The bread should tip out of the pan easily. It will be crusty on the outside and moist on the inside.

You may add other ingredients when assembling on day 1, such as, dried herbs.

That’s it!  Serve with a pot of homemade soup.  Your friends and family will think you’re a genius.

First Day of Spring 2018

After 80 degree days in February (very unusual) and just 60s yesterday, we experienced a surprise snowstorm today.  Heavy, wet snow.  Very beautiful but most of us are tired of winter.  What happened to welcoming Spring and its warm, sunny days.

These are a few shots of the snow.  Actually, this doesn’t seem to hurt the daffodils but I’d rather see their golden heads in the yard than this white stuff.

And a few more small daffodil paintings.  I just can’t seem to help myself but I might try some watercolor paintings tomorrow.

Daffodils and old houses

Daffodils-3-1000

Daffodil bouquet in silver pitcher, 10 x 10, acrylic on canvas panel, Kit Miracle

There’s something about old houses in the country that seem to showcase mature gardens, old lilacs and apple trees, meandering forsythia bushes, and banks of daffodils.  At least that is true for this old homestead.  The first few years we lived here, every season brought surprises.  Pawpaws and persimmons, hickory nuts and walnuts, even hazelnut bushes.  And flowers.  Old varieties that don’t appear in any catalog.  You can  spot old farms long after the houses are gone by the daffodils that persist and show their colors each spring.

Our yard is blessed with many varieties of daffodils.  I love their nodding yellow heads in the warm spring breezes.  The largest patch near the woodshed is always the first to come out, sometimes even through a late snow.  Then there are the doubles that seem to “walk” towards the creek a little bit more each year.  And another variety with two colors.  Some large, some small.

This week I’ve been picking bouquets for the house and the studio.  Oh, the joy of the season!  But the season won’t last for long so I’ve been in a painting frenzy with a different spring painting each day.

TABAC, Paris Street Scene

TABAC, Paris Street Scene, framed, 12 x 16, Kit Miracle

This is a painting of the view from my hotel window in the Marais district in Paris.  I loved the bright colors and was particularly attracted to the figure of the child and his nurse.  He seemed to be pointing to the TABAC store which sells not only tobacco products but sweets and newspapers.

TABAC, detail of child with nanny, original painting, Kit miracle

The restaurant next to it serves not only regular fare but Middle Eastern entrees.  I ate there several times.

But basically I just love to people watch from my hotel room.  Early in the morning, the green men (street sweepers in green uniforms) are out cleaning the streets while the shopkeepers spray down the sidewalks, preparing for the day ahead.

TABAC, Paris Street Scene, original painting, 12 x 16, Kit Miracle

Click on the images for a closer view. Painted in acrylic with impasto style on a canvas toned with green.  I thought it would balance all the blues and purples but it was a bit difficult to work with.

Treasures in the Basement

The Metropolitan Museum of Art main lobby

One of my favorite places to visit in the world in the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York.  I always manage to squeeze in a visit every time I’m in the city.  I’ve been there so often that I know the best/least crowded entrance.  And I always go straight to visit my favorite paintings and sculptures.

Generally after visiting the European galleries on the second floor to say hello to the Van Goghs and Monets, I make my way over to the American wing to visit the Sargents, Cassatts and other American painters.

The Henry R. Luce Center for the Study of American Art in the lower level of the Metropolitan Museum of Art

However, several years ago, I discovered a “secret” basement area where many treasures are stored which are not on display. Officially called The Henry R. Luce Center for the Study of American Art, there are cases filled with costumes and glassware, china and silver, and a whole lot of furniture.  And, to my surprise, I discovered cases filled with some extremely famous paintings by some of my favorite painters.  It’s a marvel to think that this museum has so much artwork that they can’t even display it all!  But I guess that many pieces are circulated to international exhibits so they always have some replacements available.

Cassatt paintings “in the basement” at the Met.

Portrait of Rosa Bonheur (The Horse Fair) by Anna Klumpke

Last year I discovered many of Mary Cassatt’s most famous pieces, a portrait of the painter Rosa Bonheur (The Horse Fair), and a large painting by Edward W. Redfield of the American Impressionist group. This doesn’t begin to cover the paintings crammed into this area.

Edward W. Redfield painting on display in the Luce Center at the Met

So, next time you’re visiting the Met, make sure to try to find this subterranean treasure trove.  If you get close to the American Wing, you may have to ask for directions on how to get there.  I usually enter from the North side of the café court.