Category Archives: travel

Painting the Snake River

Final, Snake River painting. The final step is to use some pen and ink to add some details but be careful not to add too much. I suggest that you zoom in on the image so you can get a better idea of what I’ve done. It’s really just a lot of scribbling and very loose calligraphy.

I mentioned last week that I’m teaching a watercolor landscape painting class. I let the class choose which subject they wanted to paint and they selected the colorful sunset.  Well, it seemed easy but was a little more difficult than they thought.   I’ve painted that scene three times and none of them have turned out exactly the same.

So, I thought I would try to find something a little easier for the class.  One of my selections is this scene from a trip we took out West several years ago. This is the Snake River in Idaho near Palisades Reservoir.  Such beautiful country out there.

Snake River, original photo upon which the painting was based. As you can see, I eliminated many of the shrubs in the foreground to better draw attention to the river and the mountain.

This is a classic landscape valley with pretty clouds and blue sky, a nice piney mountain, a river, and some trees up front leading us into the scene.  I only used eight colors for this painting,  three brushes, and my fade-proof ink pen.  The paper is Arches, French-made of 100% cotton rag.  The painting time was about two hours.

To see a step-by-step view of the process, click here or go to Artworks and scroll down to Snake River Landscape.

Does your high school have an art museum?

The impressive entrance to McGuire Hall. I wonder how much those giant blue vases weigh?

I had an opportunity to return to my hometown Richmond, Indiana this past week where I stopped in at my high school to visit beautiful McGuire Hall.  In addition to a lovely theatre space, this wing of the high school hosts one of the few in-school art museums in the country, Richmond Art Museum (RAM).

This is the entry hall for McGuire Hall. The wooden doors on the right lead into the theatre. It is so elegant that it’s difficult to believe this is a public high school.

The Tortoise fountain by Janet Scudder

I marveled at the marble floors and carved wood doors and trim, the Tortoise fountain by famous sculptor Janet Scudder, and the current exhibits.  They were featuring an exhibit of the works by local artist John Elwood Bundy (1853-1933). Famous for his many depictions of local scenes, especially the beeches and other sylvan scenes, at one time his work could be seen all over the area including libraries, businesses, restaurants and other locations, public and private.

Winter Landscape by John Elwood Bundy, one of the many paintings currently on exhibit at Richmond Art Museum.

Part of the exhibit by regional painter John Elwood Bundy including oils, watercolors and drawings.

The Richmond Art Museum (RAM) permanent collection is currently displaying a very nice collection of American Impressionists, regional artists and the famous Hoosier Group.  William Merritt Chase’s self-portrait is on prominent display as are other of his works.

This gallery displays some of the impressive paintings in the permanent collection.

More of the permanent collection on display.

William Merritt Chase, self-portrait.

As a student, I remember walking past these famous paintings on my way to art classes which were held in this wing.  I thought every high school had an art museum and only learned differently many years later. I remember being sent out of class to “draw something” and sitting on one of the marble staircases making my little watercolors.  I’m sure this influenced my choice of career in art making.

Richmond has a long history of support of the arts and they still have an active art scene.  There are many wonderful old homes in town and the city still holds much beauty, from the exquisite Whitewater River Valley, to Glen Miller Park, their rose garden, the famous Madonna of the Trails, and Earlham College.

Although regional art museums don’t get the same attention as do big city museums, if you’re in the area, I urge you to stop by the Richmond Art Museum which is open to the public.  I’m sure you’ll find this small gem a pleasant surprise.