Tag Archives: acrylic

High Noon, a street scene

High Noon, acrylic on canvas, 24 x 36, Kit Miracle
cityscape, landscape

I had the idea for this painting rolling around in my head for some time. The middle of the day is not my favorite time to paint as the shadows are often small and the colors are too washed out. However, I wanted to try this back-lit village scene with the street, buildings and cars.

High Noon, detail 1, showing the contre jour lighting and impressionistic brush strokes, Kit Miracle

There weren’t really any people around at the time that I took the reference photos for this painting which is surprising considering all the cars that were there.  I decided to add some people to the landscape to give it more life.

The challenge for a painting like this is, first, to get the perspective correct.  Perspective can be conveyed not only from the actual drawing but distance is also indicated by the shading. The farther away the objects, the lighter the shading. The second challenge is to ensure that the colors are right, that enough details are included without being too focused on details. It’s all a matter of balance.

High Noon, detail 2.  Adding people to a street scene makes it come alive but you don’t need to include every detail. Let the viewer’s eye fill in the story.

I added more color to the street to “lay it down”, that is, to make sure it didn’t appear floating.  This is where having a lot of experience in plein air painting helps.  Photos often make the darks too dark and the lights too light.  Copying a photo exactly often gives unsatisfying results.

Overall, I liked the challenge of this painting.  It has been on display at a local gallery and many people have recognized the scene and commented on it.

Buddha and Pomegranates Still life


Buddha and Pomegranates, still life, Lucky Red series, good luck symbols, acrylic on canvas, 16 x 20, Kit Miracle,Vitarka Mudra

This is the fourth painting in my Lucky Red series.

Detail of Buddha and Pomegranates painting, acrylic on canvas, Vitarka Mudra

The sitting Buddha represents Vitarka Mudra or the teaching Buddha. The circle made in the right hand stands for never-ending flow of energy.  The pomegranates stand for fertility, abundance and marriage.

Pomegranates, lucky red symbol, fruit, symbol of fertility, abundance, marriage

I like the slight smile on Buddha’s face along with the contrasting colors of the fruit and plant.  Painted in an impressionistic style, this painting brings a quiet, reflective mood to any setting.

Yes, of course this is for sale.  Click here. 

Alley 3- Belegravia Court, Louisville, Kentucky

Alley 3, Belgravia Court, Louisville, Kentucky, Acrylic on canvas, 20 x 16, Kit Miracle

Here is another alley painting.  Guess this is starting to be a series.

Alley 3 – detail, acrylic on canvas, couple sitting on stoop

This painting is contre-jour, painted against the light.  Here I’ve added a few figures.  A couple sitting on the stoop and a figure in the distance.  Also, the car in the alley with the tail lights as it is waiting to pull out.

Keep tuned.  I might be doing some more alley scenes in the future.

Alley 2, Belgravia Court

Alley 2, Belgravia Court, Louisville, KY, original painting, acrylic on canvas, 16 x 20, Kit Miracle

I seem to be stuck on a theme of alleys these days.  This is another alley view from Belgravia Court in Louisville, similar to last week’s post but a different alley.  I’m not sure which one I like better, the horizontal or the vertical.  Both paintings are acrylic on canvas.  Now I need to find more alleys to paint.

This is, of course, for sale on my Etsy shop.

Alley View, Belgravia Court, Louisville, Kentucky, Acrylic on Canvas

Alley, Belgravia Court, St. James, Louisville, Kentucky, original acrylic painting, 20 x 16, Kit Miracle

Last month I visited the St. James Art Fair in Louisville, Kentucky.  This is one of the most prestigious art fairs in the country. I exhibited on Belgravia Court for many, many years when I was traveling and doing art fairs.  Although the day was very hot for early October, many years the weather is rainy and miserable.  This year, the crowds were out en masse.

One of my favorite parts of walking around on city streets is looking into alleyways.  I always think of this as the back doors of the inhabitants.  The alleys seem so much more interesting to me than the front facades.  This is true for large cities or small.

This is an acrylic painting on canvas, 20 x 16.  I switched to acrylic last winter as I felt the fumes from oil painting and the solvents were probably not good to breathe in a closed environment.  As you can see, I handle acrylics very much like I handle oil paints.  The good part (and bad part) about acrylics is that they dry so much quicker.  As I painted watercolors for over 25 years, I am used to working under the clock.  To slow the drying process, I will often use a retarder which makes the acrylic paint dry more slowly.  I also like the tactile quality of oil paints.  Painting in impasto, or thick paint, is fun but challenging. It is almost like sculpting in paint. For acyrlics, I use a flexible sculpting medium to add more body to the paint even though I use heavy body paint.  The flexible medium allows the paint and canvas to breathe and to be, well, flexible.  It shouldn’t flake off the canvas as a stiffer medium would. My ultimate aim is to capture the feel and results of painting in oils without the toxic fumes.

If you are interesting in learning more about this painting or making a purchase, check out my Etsy shop at KitMiracleArt.  Also, follow my Facebook page KitMiracleArt for special discount codes.

Fall Scene with Bridge

Fall Scene with Bridge, acrylic on canvas board, 12 x 16, Kit Miracle

I love to drive around on the roads in this part of the country.  Especially this time of year, the trees are golden and a multitude of other colors.  Just looking at the scenery makes my heart sing.

This is a little one lane bridge in my county.  My son commented the other day that it’s amazing that up close, impressionistic painting looks just like a bunch of fuzzy blobs, but step back a few feet, and the whole scene looks realistic and inviting.

I couldn’t agree more.  It’s all an optical illusion.

Trees at Alton, Indiana, on the Ohio River

Trees at Alton, Indiana, on the Ohio River. Plein air, 12 x 16, Kit Miracle

Yesterday I drove up to Indianapolis to drop off a couple of paintings at the Indiana Plein Art Painters Association annual member exhibit.  I haven’t entered this before, mostly because of the three hour drive.  But the day was a beautiful fall day, starting off with some fog in low-lying areas. The fall colors were breathtaking.  For those of you who think Indiana is represented by flat cornfields, nothing could be further from the truth.  The southern part consists of beautiful hills, rivers, and streams covered mostly by deciduous forests.  This time of year, the landscape is a panorama of golds and reds.  It was just a glorious day for a drive.

One of the two paintings I entered is Trees at Alton, Indiana, on the Ohio River.  I just painted this back in late September.  As you can see, the tall trees on the left are just beginning to show some color.  Alton is a tiny little collection of houses and has been flooded many times over the years. But the people who live here are passionate about living on the Ohio River so they always come back.  There is something mesmerizing about the big river with its barges and other river traffic.  I can just sit and watch the river for hours.

This scene is pretty classic.  Just some trees, a path leading into the picture, a river and some hills.  A very peaceful vista.

If you’re interested in seeing the whole exhibit, it is at the Hoosier Salon Gallery in Carmel, just north of Indianapolis.  The exhibit runs from November 10th  through  December 14th.  The reception is Saturday,, November 10th 5-9 pm.  There are many beautiful paintings of all parts of Indiana and most of the work is for sale. Take a gander at this exhibit and visit lovely downtown Carmel with its many arty and eclectic shops and eateries.  A great time for some holiday shopping.

Visiting the Falls of the Ohio

Falls of the Ohio II, acrylic on canvas, 16 x 20, Kit Miracle. This view is looking back towards the shore from the beds, where the puddles reflect the cloudy sky and trees.

A couple of weeks ago my husband and I took a day trip to the Falls of the Ohio in New Albany, Indiana.  Although it’s only a short drive away, I had never been there.

The Falls of the Ohio is an Indiana state park set on the edge of the Ohio River.  It features large fossil beds which visitors can climb over.  You can view thousands of fossils right beneath your feet.  As the level of the river drops, more layers of fossils are uncovered.

Falls of the Ohio I, acrylic on canvas, 16 x 20, Kit Miracle. View from the treeline at the Falls, across the river towards Louisville. We saw a train crossing the bridge while we were there.

The day we visited was an in and out day, with showers alternating with sun.  I particularly loved the setting along the river.  The old trees, the puddles reflecting the trees, the skyline of Louisville across the river.  We even saw a train crossing the old bridge.

There is an interpretive center which has a fee but the visit to the Falls is free.  If you go there, it is a bit tricky to find but follow the signs.  Obviously it’s on the river so you will be looking for River Road.  Take a picnic lunch or travel along River Road to eat lunch at one of the many neat restaurants in the area.  You can even follow the road east to Jeffersonville to the walking bridge over the Ohio.

All in all, an enjoyable day. It’s good to try something new.

What’s in a name?

East Field in Evening, tetraptych, acrylic on canvas, Kit Miracle

This week I created a set of paintings but I’m not quite sure what to call them.  They are of our east field in the evening, showing the stretching shadows.

I started with one painting, the one on the far right, and that just lead to another and another and another.  Four in all…so far.  I’m actually working on a fifth one.

Since these are all painted from the same vantage point, it’s not quite a series which I consider to be more of the same subject but not necessarily from the same view.  This set of paintings creates one broad vista, each overlapping by a quarter to a third.  They don’t exactly match as far as horizon and it wasn’t my intention to do so.  But I did want to convey the same feel.  Although they work well together as a connected work of art, the individual paintings each stands alone as far as composition and technique.

My question is, what does one call four (soon to be five) paintings of the same larger subject but from the same vantage point?  If a diptych is two paintings, and a triptych is three, what is four or five?

The best information I can find is a polyptych or maybe a tetraptych or soon to be a pentaptych.  Doesn’t exactly fall off the tongue, does it?

What is your opinion?

East Field in Evening 1, acrylic on canvas, 16 x 20, Kit Miracle

East Field in Evening 2, acrylic on canvas, 16 x 20, Kit Miracle

East Field in Evening 3, acrylic on canvas, 16 x 20, Kit Miracle

East Field in Evening 4, acrylic on canvas, 16 x 20, Kit Miracle

 

“Whatever you eye falls on – for it will fall on what you love – will lead you to the questions of your life, the questions that are incumbent upon you to answer, because that is how the mind works in concert with the eye. The things of this world draw us where we need to go.” 
― Mary Rose O’ReilleyThe Barn at the End of the World: The Apprenticeship of a Quaker, Buddhist Shepherd

Gallery show, update

Kit Miracle at the J. Michael Dunn Gallery at Oakland City University, Oakland City, Indiana.

I took a drive over to Oakland City University today to see my newly-hung show at the J. Michael Dunn Gallery.  I’ll admit, it’s been a long time since I’ve had enough work to show at a solo show.  However, in the past few years I have been able to devote more time to painting and creating.

Most artists understand how amazing it is to walk into a gallery and see your work on display, especially if there are several years’ worth of work.  But to see everything out of storage and out of boxes and hung all together…well, it’s just a bit overwhelming.

I’ve posted photos of individual paintings over the past few years but I really haven’t seen the whole body of work in one place.  The first thing that struck me is the color.  I like color and it shows.

Then there’s the subject matter.   Still lifes, landscapes, portraits.  It’s all meaningful to me but I’m not sure it is to anyone else.  Nevertheless, I love seeing the work hung as a group.

The show runs from August 13th through September 28th.  The public reception and gallery talk is scheduled for Sunday, September 9th from 2 to 5 CST.  The gallery hours are M-F 10 to 5, weekends by appointment.  Check it out. Come on out for the reception or just to view the work.

https://www.oak.edu/facilities/j-michael-dunn-art-gallery

Kit Miracle, gallery show 2

Gallery show-3, Kit Miracle

Gallery show 4, Kit Miracle

Gallery show 5, Kit Miracle

Gallery show 6, Kit Miracle

Gallery show 7, Kit Miracle

Gallery show 8, Kit Miracle

Gallery show 9, Kit Miracle

Gallery show 10, Kit Miracle

Gallery show 11, Kit Miracle

Gallery show 13, Kit Miracle

Gallery show 13, Kit Miracle