Gardening news, odds and ends

Fresh picked basil, destemmed, washed and ready to be made into pesto.

We use a lot of basil in our cooking so I always plant plenty.  Instead of planting it in pots, I just sow the tiny seeds directly into the garden.  They’re about as big a specks of pepper but are very easy to grow.  If you’re diligent about weeding them when they’re just emerging, then you’ll have a big healthy crop.

Today was a drizzly, rainy overcast day.  Perfect for indoor work so I decided to make pesto.  I picked a huge bunch (overly ambitious) and set to work.  This is the pile of basil leaves after destemming and culling.  I ended up making six batches of pesto and then froze the rest of the leaves for other use.  I froze the pesto in my silicon muffin pan (they slipped out nicely when frozen) and an ice cube tray (not so much.) This will be so yummy in winter in a sauce or directly on pasta.  Yummm.

Squash plants with rag mulch. Still going strong.

The second item I want to report is an experiment I tried this year with my summer squash and zucchini.  I always plant a good row of these vegetables but it seems they die off halfway through the summer, mostly due to squash vine borer I’m guessing.  This year I decided to mulch the vines with some rags (old sheets and jeans).  I did this primarily to keep the squash from coming into contact with the soil as they tend to rot quickly.  But I had heard that there’s some connection between the squash vine borer bug and the soil so, why not?

The row of squash and zucchini. Notice the difference in growth. The zucchini (nearest) is nearly gone while the summer squash (rear) is still thriving.

One of two zucchini plants with a rag mulch. Still thriving, also.

Well, I’ll let you be the judge.  Most of the rags were placed under the summer squash plants which are still producing heavily.  I only had enough rags to place under two zucchini plants.  Result:  All of the summer squash plants are still blooming and producing, as are the two zucchini plants.  The rest of the zucchini plants have died.  So, this will definitely be on the list of experiments to try again next year.

The rags allow the soil to breathe and lets the water in while keeping down weeds.  I might try this with cardboard next year, too.  And I do rotate the crops in the garden every year.  Certainly worth trying again.

Finally, as Facebook is changing its rules, where I used to have my blog posts automatically repost to my personal Facebook profile, it will now be directed to my Facebook page KitMiracleArt.  You can follow me there.  Otherwise, I’ll try to remember to repost this to my personal profile.  I usually post on Sundays and Wednesdays.

Thanks again for stopping by.  I always love to hear from you.

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